Do you have a hard time finding things in Lotus Notes? Do you know when to search a folder? A view? Is it in your mail file or your archive?

As I coach people across MAPMG in workplace performance skills I'm frequently asked if there is an easy way to find things in IBM Lotus Notes.

There is; in fact there are many easy ways to search in Notes. Here are a few of my most used methods:
  • Within a document or view, type CTRL+F or click the binocular icon in the action bar at the top of the screen and follow the prompts
        Image:TIP: 4 quick and easy ways to find what you are looking for in IBM Lotus Notes
  • You may sort the contents of a view by clicking on any column header that has a small up/down triangle next to it. This will refresh the view according to that column. From there, start typing what you are looking for and Lotus Notes will display a dialog box and move the selection to the first line beginning with the letters you typed.
        Image:TIP: 4 quick and easy ways to find what you are looking for in IBM Lotus Notes
  • In most views, you can also click on the Magnifying glass icon or click on "View\Search" to display the search dialog. Give it a try!
        Image:TIP: 4 quick and easy ways to find what you are looking for in IBM Lotus Notes
  • Another useful method to find something is to use the built-in Global Search tool in eProductivity, which makes it easy to search across your mail, archives, and Lotus Notes Reference or Notebook files in one click. No more opening each mail or archive file and searching it individually. Click. Search. Find.
       
        Image:TIP: 4 quick and easy ways to find what you are looking for in IBM Lotus Notes       
        Note: eProductivity is available without charge to all IBM Notes users at MAPMG. Learn More.

I hope you find this quick tip helpful. If there is a tip you'd like to see or share or if I can be of service, please let us know! Perhaps you've just learned that your organization has announced a move from IBM Notes to Office 365.

Typically a migration in a large enterprise can take a long time. In some cases I am aware of 12-18 months or more. So what should you do in the mean time?

Getting Things Done In The Present

You already have the premier productivity tool for getting things done with IBM Lotus Notes - eProductivity. There are many excellent resources to help you on the eProductivity web site. If you work for Kaiser Permanente, be sure to visit the MAPMG eProductivity Community Page as well.


What about the announced plan to move from IBM Lotus Notes to Office 365?

If your company is switching in the future, you may be wondering if you should even bother to apply yourself to learn and use eProductivity.

I think you should, and here's why:

1. eProductivity is the tool you already have and it's helping people at around the world get things done faster and with less stress -- every day.
2. Even more important, eProductivity is teaching people a new way to work efficiently using the GTD methodology upon which it's based. Those skills can be transferred to any new tools in the future, including Office 365.

The more organized and efficient you can become before the migration, the easier that transition will be.

eProductivity is a win-win. You get things done now and you sharpen your skills to get things done in the future.

Still not convinced? This blog post answers the question: I heard we are moving away from IBM Lotus Notes, why should I bother with eProductivity until then?


What about eProductivity for Office 365?

I'm currently considering tools and services for users of Office 365, especially those who are forced to move from Notes and who want to maintain a trusted system to manage their projects, actions and information as they do now in eProductivity.

If that interests you, let me know.

Is there anything I can do to serve you? Do you have any questions? Let me know.


Eric

Eric Mack

Consultant and Facilitator for eProductivity at MAPMG
Workplace Performance, Productivity and Knowledge Systems

eProductivity version 4 is here!

After 10 years of development, eProductivity has proven to be a stable product; however, there's always room for improvement and the occasional fixes. :-)

This major release of eProductivity includes many new features to facilitate working with archives as well as various new productivity features.

eProductivity version 4 is available to all current monthly and annual subscribers at no charge.

[Note: If you are an enterprise user, e.g. KP, MAPMG, please do not attempt to install this update on your own. IT will push this update out to you once it is approved.]

Here are some highlights from the new release. To see the full release notes, including links to help documents, see here and here.

Productivity Features Added
  • To speed up filing emails, the 'Send & File' and 'Move to Folder' menus now display the last three folders you filed into (even if they are in another mail file or archive).
  • We've added a 'Clear due date' button to the Project and Action forms so that you can quickly remove a due date.
Archiving Features Added
These were created to make archiving easier, especially for users whose organizations use automatic archiving. These will help you manage your data better and protect your active work from being archived without your knowledge:
  • The Archiving view has been updated to make it even easier for you to see and archive completed items while protecting incomplete items.
  • Easily archive and restore folders: New buttons in folders in Mail and Archives will allow you to:
    MOVE
    the current folder (including subfolders) to an archive.
    RESTORE
    a folder (including subfolders) from an archive back to the Mail file.
  • New tasks protected from archiving until completed: All new Projects and Actions, as well as anything linked to them, will be automatically flagged to prevent them from being archived or purged until you mark them "Complete."
  • Pre-existing Project or Actions protected from archiving until completed: a new Admin tool has been added that prevents archiving of all pre-existing Projects and Actions, as well as anything linked to them. This will run automatically when you install version 4.
  • Messages in folders protected from archiving: A new setting will protect messages in folders from archiving and purging.
  • Protect completed Projects or Actions from archiving: You can now increase the period of time that eProductivity Projects and Actions are protected from archiving and purging.
I use these feature daily to manage my mail file, by pruning inactive folders full of emails to my archive, yet knowing that if I ever want to restore that folder from my archive I can do so with a single click. This will keep your Domino Administrator happy as your mail file will be smaller (and faster) yet you can trust that will be able to quickly find what you need when you need it.

Don't forget that the The eProductivity Global Search tool also makes it easy to find messages, regardless of whether they are in the mail, archive or an external mail file.

New features in eProductivity Reference

The latest version of eProductivity Reference has added two new features:
  • The Timestamp feature makes it easy to timestamp any entry in the Reference DB. This is similar to the timestamp function in journal entries, but the new Timestamp can be applied to any document in the Reference DB.
  • Documents in the Reference DB are now protected from archiving and purging by default.
So who can use eProductivity 4?
Subscription license users:
If you are a current subscriber, your activation key has already been upgraded and you are ready to enjoy the benefits of version 4. See here to download.

Perpetual License Users:
  • If you are subscribed to maintenance and support, you can download and install version 4.
  • If your maintenance and support subscription has lapsed, version 4 will not work for you without a new activation key. Your current software will continue to work. To upgrade to version 4, renew your maintenance and support subscription here.
I sometimes hear the question, "Why should I invest in the tools my people have? We're getting a shiny new tool in a year." To me, what they're really saying is: "Our people are using dull tools now, but that's ok, because in a year they're going to get another, shinier, set of tools, which may or may not be better."

Here's a practical application: I was recently talking with a client about expanding eProductivity usage at his company. He wasn't sure he wanted to, because, he said, "I've heard our company is switching from Notes to Outlook in the next year."

I responded, "Ok; let me ask you, then: would you like your people to get things done at their current level for that time, then reduce that level as you switch?— Or, would you rather get a proven productivity benefit within days, then enjoy that benefit for the next year, and give your people skills and habits to use with any tools?"

Look at this way: if your employees' job was to cut boards, but they were using dull saws, would you leave them well enough alone for a year?

Carpe annum (seize the year)

Whether you're going to be using your current tools (e.g., IBM Notes) for a short or long time, it's good to consider how much value you're getting from them. In most cases, it's not hard to sharpen the saw to get incredible value.

"Value" can be measured in a number of ways:
- How quickly you get things done
- How much of your effort is directed towards the right things to get done
- How confident and focused you are at work
- The speed and precision of your decisions
- Your ability to quickly process inputs and recalibrate

The fact is, the jobs of you and your team are more complicated than cutting boards. Your job, together, is to create value (all of the above and more) for the organization. So the question again is: what if you could use a tool now, with minimal investment, that's designed to make all of this easier?

what if you could make your current tools even easier to use and more productive with minimal investment and effort?
what if you could use a tool that's designed to make all of this easier?

The only thing worse . . .

A senior manager once told Zig Ziglar that he didn't want to waste money training his people only to have them leave. Zig's response was, "The only thing worse than training someone and losing them, is not training them and keeping them."

I take the same view on giving people good tools now. The only thing worse than giving them great tools and losing them, is not giving them great tools and keeping your current level of accomplishment. You can stay there, or get better.

The bottom line

My clients and I have seen eProductivity work hundreds of times. Some of them have even gone out of their way to measure how well it works (ask me for the impact report from PUMA).

I've seen people become more confident, relaxed, de-stressed, in-control, effective, and efficient after only a few weeks (or days) of using it. I've even come back to those people weeks or months later and found they're still working effectively. In some cases, they've even built on what they've learned and moved beyond it!

I've had the privilege of working with some forward-thinking managers and executives who've chosen to help their people. Because of that, they and their teams have gotten more from their systems and learned to think differently about how they work— and they know that what they've learned can be applied to the future to create greater value, no matter what tools they're using.

The client's decision

To me, the decision to give people great tools now and get the most from them is unmistakably clear. It was for my client as well: he decided to expand eProductivity among his people, and he considered it an investment.

He knew it would immediately boost his team's productivity for as long as they were using it. He knew the switch to Office 365 may or may not come, but he wasn't deterred from investing in his people by improving their toolkit and skills.

His time, place, position, needs, and team were not unique, and this was his decision. What's yours?

When you're ready to invest in your tools and get greater value in return, give me a call. I can help.

Coaching my clients new levels of workplace performance is my favorite thing about what I do. Sometimes it's hard, but hearing what they say afterward makes it all worth it:

Clearly, I wasn't working as efficiently as I could have.  Now, I'm creating greater results, with less effort

I had no idea such basic shifts in the way that I think about my work and how I use my tools could have such a profound impact on my performance, and my life. Thank you!

The last time my inbox was this empty was 5 years ago -- on my first day of work as CTO

I feel so much better about my work.

Sometimes, though, I run into something puzzling. After coaching a busy executive and hearing them express (over several weeks) the immense relief it's brought them, I'll bring up the subject of training the rest of their team.

Sometimes, they'll hesitate, then say, "I'm not sure they need this as much as I do . . ."

This used to stump me. I've seen my client's teams, and usually they're just as overwhelmed as the executives they answer to. My clients have gotten clear, lasting relief, so bringing the same to their team seems like a no-brainer to me. Wouldn't it be wonderful if everyone were so effective? Why not train the rest of the team?

Building people instead of buying them

Here's my philosophy on coaching: when I hire someone, I want to get their full value. To do that, they have to grow; to grow, they have to be fed.

That's why it boggles my mind when companies invest in the latest systems and tools for their employees, then refuse to invest in training them. The team is left to flail about and figure it out for themselves, always struggling just to survive in their job: overwhelmed, over-stressed, overwrought, and overboard.

As an employer, I don't want my people working that way. I want them to be effective, confident, executive, and efficient. Of course, I could simply hire someone with all the skills I want, but those tend to be very rare and very expensive; besides, they may still be unfamiliar with my tools and processes.

Honestly, I'd rather build my people.

One employee, then and now

A few years ago, I hired an intern, a recent college graduate new to the workplace. When I hired him, he knew relatively little about effective self-management and knowledge work. Most of his experience had been with someone else telling him what to do and how. He wasn't a "knowledge worker."

Now, though, he is an executive: maybe not yet in title, but in what he's capable of achieving.

He didn't get there by osmosis. I've trained him myself over time.

I could have spent my time on other activities. I could have let him sit with his current skill set and simply answer emails and do clerk-work. I could have been content to not get the full value of his potential—but I wasn't.

I chose to unleash his potential, for his benefit and mine, by investing in and training him.

Has it been worth it? I'd certainly say so.

This isn't my first time, either: I've repeated this many times, with many people over the past 30 years, and gotten tremendous value as a result.

Get the value

Maybe that's an extreme example, but it illustrates the point. You hire someone to create value for you. Even if they come in with skills, at the minimum they need to learn how to work with you and your organization to create value.

"Value" can be measured in a number of ways:
- How quickly you get things done
- How much of your effort is directed towards the right things to do
- How confident and focused you are at work
- The speed and precision of your decisions
- Your ability to quickly process inputs and recalibrate

The job of you and your team, together, is to create value (all of the above and more) for the organization. So the question again is: what if you grew value in them?

But what if you lose them?

A senior manager once told Zig Ziglar that he didn't want to waste money training his people only to have them leave. Zig's response was, "The only thing worse than training someone and losing them, is not training them and keeping them."

I take the same view. You can train your people and make them more effective, confident, executive, and efficient . . . or, you can simply stay at your current accomplishment level. Think about it.

There's more to the story of the young intern I hired. I knew from the start that our time together was limited—a year or two, at best. So why would I invest so much in him?

Again, because I wanted to build value in him, for as long as I have him. I know it's been better for him and me.

The bottom line

The bottom line is that coaching and training work, and my clients and I have seen it work hundreds of times. This includes training I've given, received, and seen others give and receive. Some of my clients have even gone out of their way to measure how well it works (ask me for the impact report from PUMA).

I've seen people become more confident, relaxed, de-stressed, in-control, effective, and efficient after only a few hours of training. I've even come back to those people weeks or months later and found they're still working effectively. In most cases, they've even built on what they've learned and moved beyond it!

I've had the privilege of working with some forward-thinking managers and executives who've chosen to invest in their people. Because of that, they and their teams have gotten far more value out of their work. Most of them aren't using any more time or energy than they were before, but they're still getting much more done and much more effectively.

The client's decision . . .

To me, the decision to train people and build their value is unmistakably clear. It was clear for my client as well: once he saw the value, he decided to extend the training to other members of his team, and greatly appreciated the benefit of it.

. . . and yours

So will you be the manager that doesn't invest in training their people, leaving them to work with their current skills until they leave you?—Or, will you invest in them and get the value of their full potential for as long as they stay? The choice is yours.

When you're ready to invest in your people and get greater value in return, give me a call. I can help.

@EricMack


LI: Eric Mack



IBMers ask: Will I lose eProductivity to Verse?

This is a question I've been getting from many IBMers. Some of them hear they're moving to Verse and throw in the towel, assuming eProductivity is lost -- but others (typically more-experienced users) have asked: will I be forced to give up eProductivity?

The answer, as far as I can tell, is no.

As long as you have access to the Lotus Notes client (whether hosted on-site or in the cloud), you can still use eProductivity Stand-alone. This will work with your current license or subscription, and it has many of the same features as eProductivity Integrated.

What should eProductivity users at IBM do to prepare for the transition to Verse?

If you're using eProductivity Integrated and are going to be transitioned to Verse soon, you should:
A) Download and open eProductivity Stand-alone
B) Follow these instructions to migrate your data from Integrated to Stand-alone
C) Follow these instructions to remove eProductivity functionality from your Notes Mail
D) Replace the design of your Notes Mail with the standard Notes Mail template (to prevent snags when IBM replaces it)

These are the best steps I can recommend to preserve your eProductivity data in useable form (especially the links between projects and actions) and prepare your Notes Mail for a smooth transition.

What's the difference between eProductivity Integrated and eProductivity Stand-alone?

1) Stand-alone lives only on your local machine, so you'll need to manually back up your data.
2) You'll need to click the "import mail" button to get your email. It looks like this: Image:IBMers ask: Will I lose eProductivity to Verse?
3) Be aware that your Stand-alone Calendar is separate from your Notes Mail Calendar
4) You will need a third-party tool (such as CompanionLink) to sync tasks to mobile from eProductivity Stand-alone.

When you're ready to stop your eProductivity from being taken away, Stand-alone is the way to go.


More on Verse and eProductivity:
Will eProductivity work with IBM Verse?
IBM Verse: our challenge and opportunity
IBMers speak up about eProductivity and switching to Verse I sometimes hear the question, "Why should I invest in the tools my people have? We're getting a shiny new tool in a year." To me, what they're really saying is: "Our people are using dull tools now, but that's ok, because in a year they're going to get another, shinier, set of tools, which may or may not be better."

Here's a practical application: I was recently talking with a client about expanding eProductivity usage at his company. He wasn't sure he wanted to, because, he said, "I've heard our company is switching from Notes to Outlook in the next year."

I responded, "Ok; let me ask you, then: would you like your people to get things done at their current level for that time, then reduce that level as you switch?— Or, would you rather get a proven productivity benefit within days, then enjoy that benefit for the next year, and give your people skills and habits to use with any tools?"

Look at this way: if your employees' job was to cut boards, but they were using dull saws, would you leave them well enough alone for a year?

Carpe annum (seize the year)

Whether you're going to be using your current tools (e.g., IBM Notes) for a short or long time, it's good to consider how much value you're getting from them. In most cases, it's not hard to sharpen the saw to get incredible value.

"Value" can be measured in a number of ways:
- How quickly you get things done
- How much of your effort is directed towards the right things to get done
- How confident and focused you are at work
- The speed and precision of your decisions
- Your ability to quickly process inputs and recalibrate

The fact is, the jobs of you and your team are more complicated than cutting boards. Your job, together, is to create value (all of the above and more) for the organization. So the question again is: what if you could use a tool now, with minimal investment, that's designed to make all of this easier?

what if you could make your current tools even easier to use and more productive with minimal investment and effort?
what if you could use a tool that's designed to make all of this easier?

The only thing worse . . .

A senior manager once told Zig Ziglar that he didn't want to waste money training his people only to have them leave. Zig's response was, "The only thing worse than training someone and losing them, is not training them and keeping them."

I take the same view on giving people good tools now. The only thing worse than giving them great tools and losing them, is not giving them great tools and keeping your current level of accomplishment. You can stay there, or get better.

The bottom line

My clients and I have seen eProductivity work hundreds of times. Some of them have even gone out of their way to measure how well it works (ask me for the impact report from PUMA).

I've seen people become more confident, relaxed, de-stressed, in-control, effective, and efficient after only a few weeks (or days) of using it. I've even come back to those people weeks or months later and found they're still working effectively. In some cases, they've even built on what they've learned and moved beyond it!

I've had the privilege of working with some forward-thinking managers and executives who've chosen to help their people. Because of that, they and their teams have gotten more from their systems and learned to think differently about how they work— and they know that what they've learned can be applied to the future to create greater value, no matter what tools they're using.

The client's decision

To me, the decision to give people great tools now and get the most from them is unmistakably clear. It was for my client as well: he decided to expand eProductivity among his people, and he considered it an investment.

He knew it would immediately boost his team's productivity for as long as they were using it. He knew the switch to Outlook may or may not come, but he wasn't deterred from investing in his people by improving their toolkit and skills.

His time, place, position, needs, and team were not unique, and this was his decision. What's yours?

When you're ready to invest in your tools and get greater value in return, give me a call. I can help.

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"GTD®" and "Getting Things Done®" are registered trademarks of the David Allen Company. Lotus® and Lotus Notes® are registered trademarks of IBM Corporation.